Tyrrhenian Sea

Tyrrhenian Sea
Tyrrhenian Sea map.png
Tyrrhenian Sea.
LocationMediterranean Sea
Coordinates40°N 12°E / 40°N 12°E / 40; 12
TypeSea
Basin countriesItaly, France (Corsica)
Surface area275,000 km2 (106,200 sq mi)
Average depth2,000 m (6,562 ft)
Max. depth3,785 m (12,418 ft)

The Tyrrhenian Sea (n/; Italian: Mar Tirreno [mar tirˈrɛːno], French: Mer Tyrrhénienne [mɛʁ tiʁenjɛn], Sardinian: Mare Tirrenu, Corsican: Mari Tirrenu, Sicilian: Mari Tirrenu, Neapolitan: Mare Tirreno) is part of the Mediterranean Sea off the western coast of Italy. It is named for the Tyrrhenian people, identified since the 6th century BCE with the Etruscans of Italy.

Geography

The sea is bounded by the islands of Corsica and Sardinia (to the west), the Italian peninsula (regions of Tuscany, Lazio, Campania, Basilicata, and Calabria) to the east, and the island of Sicily (to the south).[1] The Tyrrhenian sea also includes a number of small islands like Capri, Elba, Ischia and Ustica.[2]

The maximum depth of the sea is 3,785 metres (12,418 ft).

The Tyrrhenian Sea is situated near where the African and Eurasian Plates meet; therefore mountain chains and active volcanoes such as Mount Marsili are found in its depths. The eight Aeolian Islands and Ustica are located in the southern part of the sea, north of Sicily.

Extent

The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Tyrrhenian Sea as follows:[3]

Exits

There are four exits from the Tyrrhenian Sea (north to south):

Exit Location Width Connected Sea
Corsica Channel between Tuscany and Corsica 42°50′N 9°45′E / 42°50′N 9°45′E / 42.833; 9.750 about 80 kilometres (50 mi) Ligurian Sea
Strait of Bonifacio between Corsica and Sardinia 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) Mediterranean Sea (proper)
no name between Sardinia and Sicily about 290 kilometres (180 mi) Mediterranean Sea (proper)
Strait of Messina between Sicily and Calabria on the toe of Italy 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) Ionian Sea

Basins

The Tyrrhenian Basin is divided into two basins (or plains), the Vavilov plain and the Marsili plain. They are separated by the undersea ridge known as the Issel Bridge, after Arturo Issel.[4]