Siege of Jaén (1245–46)

Siege of Jaén
Part of the Reconquista
Alhamar, rey de Granada, rinde vasallaje al rey de Castilla, Fernando III el Santo (Museo del Prado).jpg
Muhammad I of Granada surrendering Jaén to Ferdinand III of Castile and agreeing to be his vassal. 1883 painting by Pedro González Bolívar.
Date1245-28 February 1246
Location
ResultHanding over of the city of Jaén to Castile after the signing of the Treaty of Jaén.
Belligerents
Bandera de la Corona de Castilla.svg Kingdom of Castile
Cross Santiago.svg Order of Santiago
Flag of Almohad Dynasty.svg Taifa of Jaén (جيان)
Standard of Grenade after Cresques Atlas s XIV.svg Emirate of Granada
Commanders and leaders
Bandera de la Corona de Castilla.svg Ferdinand III of Castile
Cross Santiago.svg Pelayo Pérez Correa
Standard of Grenade after Cresques Atlas s XIV.svg Muhammad I of Granada
Strength
UnknownUnknown
Casualties and losses
UnknownUnknown
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The Siege of Jaén was the final siege on the city during the Spanish Reconquista. The siege, was carried out from 1245 through 28 February 1246 by forces of the Kingdom of Castile and the Order of Santiago commanded by Ferdinand III of Castile and the Grand Master of the Order of Santiago, Pelayo Pérez Correa, against a combined defending force of the local Taifa of Jaén (جيان) and the Emirate of Granada under Muhammad I. The battle resulted in a Castilian victory with the city of Jaén being handed over to the Kingdom of Castile and Leon after the signing of the Treaty of Jaén.[1]

Context

After two previous attempts to capture Jaén, first in 1225 and another in 1230, Ferdinand III of Castile decided on another attempt to besiege the city having consolidated his power over the thrones of Castile and León and not having been decisively beaten in either of his previous attempts on the city. He was supported in this new campaign by Pelayo Pérez Correa, the Grand Master of the Order of Santiago. Throughout the winter of 1245, the forces of Castile launched raids on the areas surrounding the city in preparation for an eventual siege, capturing strategic points in the surrounding areas.