Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia

New Scotland  (English)
Nouvelle-Écosse  (French)
Alba Nuadh  (Scottish Gaelic)
Motto(s): 
Munit Haec et Altera Vincit
(Latin: One defends and the other conquers)
CountryCanada
Confederation1 July 1867 (1st, with Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick)
CapitalHalifax
Largest metroHalifax
Government
 • TypeConstitutional monarchy
 • Lieutenant GovernorArthur Joseph LeBlanc
 • PremierStephen McNeil (Liberal)
LegislatureNova Scotia House of Assembly
Federal representation(in Canadian Parliament)
House seats11 of 338 (3.3%)
Senate seats10 of 105 (9.5%)
Area
 • Total55,284 km2 (21,345 sq mi)
 • Land52,942 km2 (20,441 sq mi)
 • Water2,342 km2 (904 sq mi)  4.2%
Area rankRanked 12th
 0.6% of Canada
Population
 (2016)
 • Total923,598 [1][2]
 • Estimate 
(2019 Q2)
966,858 [3]
 • RankRanked 7th
 • Density17.45/km2 (45.2/sq mi)
Demonym(s)Nova Scotian, Bluenoser
Official languagesEnglish (de facto)[4]
GDP
 • Rank7th
 • Total (2016)C$42.715 billion[5]
 • Per capitaC$44,931 (12th)
Time zoneAtlantic: UTC-4
Postal abbr.
NS
Postal code prefixB
ISO 3166 codeCA-NS
Flower
Trailing arbutus 2006.jpg
  Mayflower
Tree
Picea rubens cone.jpg
  Red spruce
Bird
OspreyNASA.jpg
  novascotia.ca
Rankings include all provinces and territories

Nova Scotia (ə/; Latin for "New Scotland"; French: Nouvelle-Écosse; Scottish Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is one of Canada's three Maritime Provinces, and one of the four provinces that form Atlantic Canada. Its provincial capital is Halifax. Nova Scotia is the second-smallest of Canada's ten provinces, with an area of 55,284 square kilometres (21,300 sq mi), including Cape Breton and another 3,800 coastal islands. As of 2016, the population was 923,598. Nova Scotia is Canada's second-most-densely populated province, after Prince Edward Island, with 17.4 inhabitants per square kilometre (45/sq mi).[1]

Etymology

"Nova Scotia" means "New Scotland" in Latin[6] and is the recognized English-language name for the province. In both French and Scottish Gaelic, the province is directly translated as "New Scotland" (French: Nouvelle-Écosse. Gaelic: Alba Nuadh). In general, Romance and Slavic languages use a direct translation of "New Scotland", while most other languages use direct transliterations of the Latin / English name. The province was first named in the 1621 Royal Charter granting to Sir William Alexander in 1632 the right to settle lands including modern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and the Gaspé Peninsula.[7]