Moravia

Moravia

Morava
The town of Mikulov
The town of Mikulov

CZ-cleneni-Morava-wl.png
Moravia (green) in relation to the current regions of the Czech Republic
Location of Moravia in the European Union
Location of Moravia in the European Union
Coordinates: 49°30′N 17°00′E / 49°30′N 17°00′E / 49.5; 17UTC+2 (CEST)

Moravia (-/ RAY-vee-ə, -⁠RAH-, moh-;[6] Czech: Morava; German: About this soundMähren ; Polish: Morawy; Latin: Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia. The medieval and early modern Margraviate of Moravia was a crown land of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown (from 1348 to 1918), an imperial state of the Holy Roman Empire (1004 to 1806), later a crown land of the Austrian Empire (1804 to 1867) and briefly also one of 17 former crown lands of the Cisleithanian part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1867 to 1918. During the early 20th century, Moravia was one of the five lands of Czechoslovakia from 1918 to 1928; it was then merged with Czech Silesia, and eventually dissolved by abolition of the land system in 1949.

Moravia has an area of over 22,000 km2[7] and about 3 million inhabitants, which is roughly 2/7 or 30% of the whole Czech Republic. The statistics from 1921 states, that the whole area of Moravia including the enclaves in Silesia covers 22,623.41 km2.[8][9] The people are historically named Moravians, a subgroup of Czechs (as understood by Czechs). Moravia also had been home of a large German-speaking population until 1945. The land takes its name from the Morava river, which rises in the northern tip of the region and flows southward to the opposite end, being its major stream. Moravia's largest city and historical capital is Brno. Before being sacked by the Swedish army during the Thirty Years' War, Olomouc was another capital.[5]

Though officially abolished by an administrative reform in 1949, Moravia is still commonly acknowledged as a specific land in the Czech Republic. Moravian people are considerably aware of their Moravian identity and there is some rivalry between them and the Czechs from Bohemia.[10][11]

Moravian Banner of Arms[12][13]

Etymology

The region and former margraviate of Moravia, Morava in Czech, is named after its principal river Morava. It is theorized that the river's name is derived from Proto-Indo-European *mori: "waters", or indeed any word denoting water or a marsh.[14]

The German name for Moravia is Mähren, again from the river's German name March. Interestingly, this might hint at a different etymology, as march is a term used in the Medieval times for an outlying territory, a border or a frontier (cf. English march).