John II, Duke of Bourbon

John II
Duke of Bourbon
JeanIIdeBourbonFouquet1470.jpg
John II, Duke of Bourbon, detail of an illumination by Jean Fouquet, [1]
Full name
Jean de Bourbon
Born1426
Died1 April 1488
Château de Moulins
Spouse(s)Joan of Valois
Catherine of Armagnac
Jeanne de Bourbon-Vendôme
Issue
John, Count of Clermont
Louis, Count of Clermont
FatherCharles I, Duke of Bourbon
MotherAgnes of Burgundy

Jean (John) de Bourbon, Duke of Bourbon (1426 – 1 April 1488, Château de Moulins), sometimes referred to as John the Good and The Scourge of the English, was a son of Charles I of Bourbon and Agnes of Burgundy.[1] He was Duke of Bourbon and Auvergne from 1456 to his death.[2]

Life

John II at prayer, wearing the collar of the Order of Saint-Michel, from the chapel in the crypt of the Sainte-Chapelle at Bourbon-l'Archambault, attributed to Michel Colombe (Walters Art Museum).
A portrait of John's third wife Jeanne of Bourbon-Vendome.
A 19th century portrait of John II, Duke of Bourbon by Jean-Léonard Lugardon [fr].

John earned his nicknames "John the Good" and "The Scourge of the English" for his efforts in helping drive out the English from France.[1]

He was made constable of France in 1483 by his brother Peter and sister-in-law Anne, to neutralize him as a threat to their regency.[citation needed]

In an effort to win discontented nobles back to his side, Louis XI of France made great efforts to give out magnificent gifts to certain individuals; John was a recipient of these overtures. According to contemporary chronicles, the King received John in Paris with "honours, caresses, pardon, and gifts; everything was lavished upon him".[3] In further attempts to gain the nobles' favor, the King proposed a match between his eldest legitimized daughter Marguerite to John's eldest illegitimate son Louis de Bourbon. The marriage was celebrated in Paris with royal magnificence and the wedded couple were heaped with honors and wealth by the King.[3] It has been said despite all of his brilliant marriages, nothing flattered John more than this particular marriage between his natural son and a legitimized daughter of the King.[3]

John is notable for making three brilliant alliances but leaving no legitimate issue.